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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 69 (some duplicates have been removed)
by a cambridge electorate. at school, he was actually discouraged from pursuing a career in science. >> it was a completely ridiculous idea because there was no hope whatsoever of my doing science and then a time spent on it would be a total waste on my part and whoever had to teach me. but the nobel jury beg to differ. >> we now knew that -- know that development is not strictly a one-way street. >> there is hope that their work will pave the way for developing methods to diagnose and treat many diseases. >> to find out more about this, we are joined by our science correspondent. a lot of people around the world are working in stem cell research. why did these two get the prize? >> they got it for the same reason a lot of nobel prize laureates have gotten it -- they went against the currents. we used to believe that cell differentiation only went in one direction. you had these undifferentiated cells, stem cells, and then they became something in the course of development. in the embryo has a lot of them and they turn into bone, skin, liver. everyone thought it only went in one dir
will take a close look here at edwards life sciences. this is a company that deals a lot with your heart. heart valve therapy, critical care, cardiac surgery, they are cutting their sales outlook for the third quarter. a couple reasons why they are doing this. take a look at the two-day chart. down nearly 20% today. that is a huge move for a company that has had a nice run for the year 2012. they are blaming europe. also, the expected growth here in the u.s. was not what they anticipated. lori: thank you. move over baggage fees, long lines and delays. talking on your cell phone at 10,000 feet. what do you think? next season take a look at some of today's winners and losers. green mountain coffee. up almost 2% on the day. we will be right back. ♪ 0t[h7 [ male announcer ] what if you had thermal night-vision goggles, like in a special opsission? you'd spot movement, gather intelligence with minimal coateral damage. but rather than neutralizing enemies in their sleep, you'd be targeti stocks to trade. well, that's what trade architect's heat maps do. they make you a trading assassin. tra
of marine science says the pace of damages kicking up. cyclones of predatory starfish are the main causes along with: gas shipments and global warming. >> coral reefs provide the breeding ground for countless species of fish. the great barrier reef is no exception. commercial fishing is now mostly banned across much of the area. three 6 cents more than 2,600 kilometers along the us trillion coast. the northern part of the refinements largely intact. it is the southern part scientists are worried about. severe storms are said to have cost nearly 50 percent -- said to have caused nearly 50% of the damage. a further 40% was caused by starfish that feed on the coral. one species, the crown of thorns, has proven especially deadly for the coral cover. >> we believe if we can take action on one of the things we can directly control, the crown of thorns starfish, it may leave the reef in a position where it can better withstand some of the climatic impact spite cyclone and coral bleaching. >> regardless of what is causing the damage, brain biologists say action needs to be taken now to save the r
of marine science released a report tuesday saying a number of reeves has gone from 100 to 47 since 1985. experts blame the rapid increase in crown of thornz star fish which eat the coral. they found that ocean warming is a major cause of coral bleaching and prevents the coral from recovering from cyclone damage and they worry that it could halve againy the next decade if current trends continue. >> we believe if we can take action, the crown of thorn star fish, it may leave the reef in a position that can better withstand the climactic impact. >> the great barrier reef extends more than 2,000 kilometers off the coast of northeastern australia and is a world heritage site. >>> a gallery of japanese art has opened at an art museum in melbourne, australia. a ceremony was held on tuesday for the opening of the paulen gander gallery of japanese art named after gandel who donated her collection of japanese art. they performed a japanese ritual to celebrate the opening and the exhibits include a buddhist statue from the 8th to 12th century and a hanging scroll by an 18th century artist. it has
train teachers, and i want to hire another 100,000 new math and science teachers and create 2 million more slots in our community colleges so people can get trained for the jobs that are out there right now. and i want to make sure we keep tuition low for our young people. when it comes to our tax code, governor romney and i both agree our corporate tax rate is too high, i want to lower it, particularly for manufacturing, taking it down to 25%, but i also want to close those loopholes that are giving incentives for companies that are shipping jobs overseas, i want to provide tax breaks for companies that are here in the united states, on energy, governor romney and i, we both agree we have to boost american energy production and oil and natural gas production are higher than they've been in years, but i also believe that we have to look at the energy sources of the future like wind, solar, biofeels, and make those investments, so all of this is possible. now, in order for to us do it, we have to close our deficit, and one of the things we've been discussing tonight, how do we deal wit
professor are the winners of the nobel prize in science. the prize is $1.2 million that they will share. a quick reminder of our top story, hugo chavez has hailed his presidential electoion win as a continuance of his socialist revolution. stay with us. there's plenty more to come. >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding for this presentation was made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to understand the industry you operate in, working to nurture new ventures and help provide capital for key strategic decisions. we offer expertise and tailored solutions in a wide range of industries. what can we do for you? >> "bbc world news" was presented by kcet, los angeles.
. and a lot of bad news coming out of research by the australian institute of marine sciences that as you pointed out half of the coral in the great barrier reef has declined largely due to both tropical storms, a crown of thorns starfish that feeds on the coral up to 40% declined just from the starfish alone and of course climate change and coral bleaching. >> so storms, starfish, climate change. what can we do to stop the coral loss? >> well, this is some scary news. this is much more than anyone expected. but there is a little bit of a silver lining. we believe the crown of thorns starfish in their larva stages grow faster because of runoff and fertilizer off the coast of australia. so scientists are calling for vehicler controls on that runoff going into the reef which may help to reduce the population of the crown of thorns starfish and hopefully relieve some of the pressure. they believe up to 42% of the decline of the great barrier reef has been caused by extreme outbreaks of these crown of thorns starfish. so hopefully reducing runoff can have a positive impact and allow the reef
. another standout stock, gilead sciences is up 70% year-to-date, ubs has it as its top large tech biotech pick, it's attractively trading to a discount to the biotech sector, biogen up 50% in the past year thanks to its strong earnings performance and anticipation riding behind its multiple sclerosis drug bg12 which could get approval by year's end. another is buyout speculation. the firms are on the hunt for under the radar biotech firms, bristol-myers among others making big bets. andrew you've been following that as well. >> thank you for that report. lot of beta. see if there's any alpha. >>> in the next hour of "squawk box" former ubs american chairman robert wolf will join us to talk financials, jobs and the election, mr. obama's favorite banker. and later health care, a major issue for americans in the presidential candidates, the coo of mt. sinai, ken david, is going to join us. a crash management system and the world's only tridion safety cell which can withstand over three and a half tons. small in size. big on safety. which can withstand over three and a half tons. if we want t
train teachers. so i want to hire another 100,000 new math and science teachers. and create 2 million more slots in our community colleges so that people can get trained for the jobs that are out there right now. and i want to make sure that we keep tuition low, for our young people. when it comes to our tax code, governor romney and i both agree that our corporate tax rate is too high. so i want to lower it, particularly for manufacturing, taking it down to 25%. but i also want to close those loopholes that are giving incentives for companies that are shipping jobs overseas, i want to provide tax breaks for companies that are investing here in the united states, on energy, governor romney and i both agree, we have to boost american energy production. and oil and natural gas production are higher than they have been in years. but i also believe that we have to look at the energy source of the future, like wind, solar and bio-fuels and make those investments. so all of this is possible. now, in order foritous do it, we to have to close our deficit. one of the think thises i am sure we
sciences. >> this is a company i don't recommend stocks on a take overbasis. i don't like the fundamentals at sce. let's go to greg in new hampshire. greg? >> caller: jim, big boo-yah. >> hey, greg. >> caller: how do you like questcor? >> you can't. now they added this dividend and that's terrific, but they were not as -- let's say they really made you feel great about the situation before they should have. how about that? let's go to sam in missouri. sam? >>. >> caller: jim, thank you for taking my all. osur. >> everyone is selling it off now because the drug is selling and no one is selling. all the anticipation is going. i like the stock at 10. i think it's cheap. let's go to robin in california. robin? >> caller: hello, jim. diagoe. >> if that come downs, that's the danny walker family and they're doing quite well. >> caller: hey, jim cramer, i wanted to wish you a big boo-yah. >> thank you, same. >> caller: i want to know how do you feel about esrx? >> express scripts, that merger -- >> buy, buy, buy! >> that stock doesn't come in. when it does come in, i need you to pull the trigger.
fracking operation. >> the science has been faulty a vendetta against red white and bl the >> at the heart of the debate of environmental policy is the environmental protection agency. america is a lot cleaner than it used to be. many give the epa the credit. that isn't all the agency is doing or hopes to do in the future. should americans worry about epa increase? >> want to talk about environmental problems in america? look back a few decades. la smog was so bad in the 1940s one day panicked californians thought the japanese launched a chemical weapons attack. in the 1950s you could barely see across pittsburgh many days in 1965 time magazine pronounced lake erie a dead sea kill bide industrial pollution. president johnson declared the raw sewage flowing down the potomac a national disgrace. for the first time polls showed the environment was one of america's greatest worries. that presented an opportunity to lbj's successor. >> president nixon in 1968 he was moved that to say to his people get out in front of the environment. >> days after nixon took office a huge oil spill hit santa ba
academy of sciences in stockholm made the announcement on tuesday. professor hideshi hara from the ecole normale superieure paris and university of colorado physicist david wineland were honored for their breakthroughs in quantum physics. they studied the interaction of light and matter. the field has been rapidly progressing since the mid-80s. haroche and wineland's research is serving as the basis for super fast computers currently in development. >>> japan's prime minister has achieved something he won't be celebrating. an nhk poll suggests the support rate for yoshihiko noda and his cabinet has fallen to its lowest level since his government was sworn in september last year. nhk surveyed 1,056 people between saturday and monday. participants were aged 20 and older. they gave the cabinet the support rate of 26%. that's down five percentage points from last month's survey. the number of voter who is don't support the cabinet is up by five points to 58%. the support rate for the prime minister's democratic party hit its lowest level since it took office. it fell by three percentage poin
,000 math and science teachers and two million workers at community college and bring down the cost of college tuition. connell: president obama live in the campaign rally in fairfax, virginia with his first reaction to the drop in unemployment rate talking about the five million jobs he says have been created under his watch and now going into campaign arguments we are likely to hear. dagen: that is your headline if running for reelection. unemployment rate at the lowest level since he took office. back to where it was in january of 2009. on the other side from mitt romney later this morning. out campaigning and rich edson is reporting from virginia. how do these campaigns treat this? connell: we lost rich because he is at the obama rally. we will get to him after a quick break. dagen: can't hear us. dagen: virginia has big voices. connell: i have heard that before. mitt romney will be in dagen mcdowell's home state. we're back with more coverage. the dow up 50 points and wayne rogers still to come on markets now. dagen: from alabama or originally and the winner -- ♪ [ male annou
, improving how we train teachers. now i want to hire another thousand math and science teachers and create 2 million more slots in community colleges so people can get trained for the jobs out there right now. and i want to make sure that we keep tuition low for our young people. when it comes to our tax code, governor romney and i both agree that our corporate tax rate is too high. so i want to lower it particularly for manufacturing. taking it down to 25%. but i also want to close loopholes that are giving incentives for companies shipping jobs overseas. i want to give breaks to those investing in the united states. on energy, we both agree we've got to boost american production. oil and natural gas production are higher than they've been in years. but i also believe that we've got to look at the energy sources of the future like wind and solar and biofuels and make those investments. now, all of this is possible. in order for us to do it we'll have to close our deficit. one of the things tonight we'll discuss is how do we deal with our tax code and make sure we're reducing spending in a r
how we hire teachers. not to hire new math and science teachers and create 2 million more slots in our community colleges so people can get trained for the jobs out there right now. and i want to make sure we keep tuition low for our young people. when it comes to our tax code, governor romney and i both agree are corporate tax rate is too high, so i want to lower it, particularly for manufacturing. taken it down to 25%. but i also want to close those loopholes that give incentives for companies shipping jobs overseas. i want to provide tax breaks for companies investing in the united states upon energy. governor romney and i both agree that we've got to boost american energy production and oil and natural gas production are higher than they have been in years. but i also believe that we've got to look at the energy sources of the future, like wind and solar and biofuels and make those investments. so, all of this is possible. now in order for us to do agree how to to close our deficit in one of the things we will discuss tonight is how do we do with our tax code and how do we make sur
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 69 (some duplicates have been removed)